Tag: parenting

Dr. Deborah Gilboa: On Raising Resilient and Independent Kids

Dr. Deborah Gilboa: On Raising Resilient and Independent Kids

Welcome back to the second season of the Erica Diamond Podcast! I recently saw Dr. G speak in Montreal on how to raise resilient children, and I was truly captivated. She’s both exceptionally knowledgeable, and extremely relatable, which you will come to hear throughout our interview.

Hear how we can foster resilience at home AND in the workplace. Know when to rescue our kids, and when to hang them out to dry! Dr. Deborah Gilboa will walk us through it all.

Listen for new episodes every second Monday!

Mindset and the Power of YET

Mindset and the Power of YET

Our mindset on learning and trying new things is one of the fundamental skills that guide us from a young age to adulthood and continues to develop throughout our lives. Beyond academic intelligence, research suggests that having a growth mindset has other advantages, including coping better with transition, higher abilities to regulate, learning grit and pro-social behaviours.

The use or misuse of praise can encourage both a fixed mindset or growth mindset depending on what or how we praise and give feedback. To develop the growth mindset, we must remember to praise the process and NOT the person. Praising the process helps remind children that we are constantly learning. The problem with praising the person, such as “you’re so clever” or “you must be so talented,” is that it doesn’t tell children what they need to do next time, and therefore it will become more challenging to develop past a fixed mindset.

Erica Diamond's Back To School Checklist

Erica Diamond’s Back To School Checklist

Back to School is indeed a thing, and it’s almost upon us! In fact, for many of my American friends, you guys are already there.

I love a new school year. I really do. Fresh binders, crisp loose leaf paper, unmarked notepads, clean pens, unchewed erasers. The organized life! I dig it, ladies.

On Global News this morning, I shared my tips on taking on and tackling the year. Hint: it starts now.

Stayin' Up Late

Stayin’ Up Late

When I started teaching yoga last fall, I committed to two classes a week (knowing two classes per week was what my schedule would comfortably allow). Two day classes, that is, as I have always reserved my nights for my kids and husband exclusively. I try and book very few things during the week (the odd girls night out, absolutely). I want to be there every night for dinner, homework, showers, and snuggles.

But when a few of my yogis recently requested I teach a night class as they work during the day, I was really hesitant to say yes. I made a vow to myself and my family 10 years ago not to work nights unless I was called away to speak. I started to talk to myself. Yes, I do that… a lot. I said to myself, “It’s springtime, Erica. The days are long, and I think I’ll go out of my comfort zone and maybe say yes.” I did, after all, watch Shonda Rhimes’ TED Talk on the Year of Yes. You know, the year when she said YES to everything to welcome more happiness? 😉

Why Does Doing the Right Thing Sometimes Feel So Wrong?

Why Does Doing the Right Thing Sometimes Feel So Wrong?

“This will hurt me more than it will hurt you!” 

No kid ever believed this when they heard it come from the lips of their parent, usually just before they were going to be spanked or punished. And those of us who did hear it, swore that we would never say it, and many of us also decided then and there that we were never going to spank our kids.

Other expressions like “My way or the highway” and, of course, “As long as you’re living under my roof, you’ll…” -fill in the blank.  The message was clear… you were living in your parent’s house, there were rules and consequences for breaking those rules, and there were clear expectations about the responsibilities you had as a result of being part of the family unit and a child – making your bed, taking care of your younger siblings, setting the table, etc. – whatever the requirements were for your family.

When The Dress Doesn't Fit

When The Dress Doesn’t Fit

It would not zip up.

It had, not two weeks ago, zipped just fine—with extra room, in fact. But now, forty-five minutes before we were supposed to be sitting in the wedding chapel pew, the beautiful silk cocktail dress would not zip. The wedding was at 5:30 on Saturday evening. It was black-tie (technically “optional,” but not practically so). The bride’s family was from New York City, and the wedding was in an upscale part of Connecticut. I had packed only one formal dress to wear. This dress. This dress that was supposed to fit, but didn’t.

“Let me see,” my husband said as I started pacing in the tiny Air B&B Bedroom that looked like an explosion of somebody’s great aunt’s entire nick-knack collection. We’re talking cat figurines, cat clocks, a cat doorstop, and some angels (of course there were angels—with older women of the great-aunt variety, where there are always cats and angels). There were also weird glass bowls, and teacups, and not enough room on either side of the bed to fit both suitcases. There were proper inns, of course, but those cost three times as much, and we have other things to pay for, like diapers.

Run Out Of Snack Ideas For Your Kids?

Run Out Of Snack Ideas For Your Kids?

As a mom of two active and sporty boys, I am always concerned about what they put into their mouths. Is it healthy? Will it sustain them? Snacks are a big thing in our house! “Mom, can you please get some goooood snacks?”

The challenge is always something tasty AND healthy. We’re pretty good in the fruits and vegetables department, but after that, I’m often at a loss.

Dropout: How My Daughter Began A Four Year Disengagement From High School

Dropout: How My Daughter Began A Four Year Disengagement From High School

All parents imagine how life will unfold for their children.

I, of course, imagined my eldest daughter would finish high school.

I was filled with anxiety and confusion when it all started to unravel. In the fall of 2000 while in Grade 7, after a successful time in elementary school, my 12-year-old Avery, began what would be a four-year disengagement from school.

Why would a privileged, middle-class adolescent choose this when dropping out was nothing short of taboo and would complicate her life?

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